Monthly Archives: May 2015

Musician Cat. Embroidered Postcard

After digging through a pile of vintage postcards to pick out some for printed backgrounds I sell, the first thing I usually do is checking whether the image looks good on fabric and if there are enough details to stitch with silk ribbons. Sometimes I stitch over a tiny piece of print just to fulfill my curiosity and check out how it would look like if embellished with ribbons. However, once I started stitching on this postcard, I just could not bring myself to stop until it’s been completely done.
Musician Cat Silk Ribbon Embroidery

It’s absolutely stunning postcard, I love that cheeky musician puss hypnotising birds. Look how stunned they are with its beautiful play. Totally paralysed!

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Garden Party. Part 3: Foxgloves

I’m quite a beginner in gardening and have never grown foxgloves. All I know about them is that they are incredibly tall and bumblebees love them. So when I started stitching my next flower from ‘Garden Party’ design I thought it wouldn’t be my favourite one. I’m also usually sceptical about scaling down large plants for miniature silk ribbon embroidery, as, let’s be honest, it is very hard to make tiny piece that still got enough detail to look life-like. After all, two already finished flowers — forget-me-not and wisteria — are quite rich in detail, the foxglove should match them to feel in place. With these thoughts and somewhat skeptical attitude I made the first bright pink foxglove (or it might be a hollyhock) and immediately fell in love with it as soon as it was finished. There are so much details in this small embroidery. You don’t notice them when you see the whole picture, but you do recognise them whilst stitching. And the flowers are so bright and crisp in colour — everything that I love.Foxgloves Silk Ribbon Embroidery 1

It’s common to stitch foxglove flowers with ribbon stitches, that’s why I reckon it might be a mistake in a magazine where I got the pattern from and it’s a hollyhock as a matter of fact. Anyway, I like Helen Ericsson’s choice to go for the gathered flowers. They might look not as an identical copy of real foxgloves, but the stylisation is absolutely charming, and the flowers are strikingly recognisable.  They remind me of a cottage garden.

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Garden Party. Part 2: Wisteria

I’m still very enthusiastic about completing Garden Party design by talented Helen Eriksson and here is one more plant finished — a wisteria. It’s the second flower out of nine, the first one is forget-me-not that I’ve shared earlier. The whole panel is worked in silk ribbon embroidery technique, and what I love about it most is that finishing each flower takes no time at all and all of them look very realistic indeed (at least on photos in a magazine with stitching instructions). I wasn’t sure when I just started stitching the wisteria that my embroidered version would look real-like, but as soon as finished it, I totally fell in love with it and there’s no doubt in me that it’s highly recognisable.

Wisteria Branch – Silk Ribbon Embroidery

At first I thought that suggested silk ribbon would be too pale for the design, but surprisingly its subtle variations worked well here, so I didn’t consider any other options at all. I used the darkest ribbon sections for upper parts of the bunches and the rest for lower parts as were recommended in the magazine.

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Free Tutorial. Cherry Blossom Stitched with a Ribbon Side Stitch

I’m totally in love with my new textile postcard. It’s stitched on one of those fabric backgrounds  I stock. I’m still not sure if it’s a cherry or an apple blossom. First I thought it’s an apple, but pink stamens made me a bit suspicious and now it looks more like a cherry for me. Anyway, flowers of both species are similar in shape and it’s the same way to go about stitching them. I used my favourite silk ribbon embroidery technique to brighten up the print.

Cherry Blossom Silk Ribbon Embroidery Postcard Continue reading